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Port Talbot accommodation

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Towers Hotel & Spa

  • Hotel
  • Neath
  • £100 to £120 per night
  • Distance 4.1 miles
Swansea and Gower
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Castle Hotel

  • Hotel
  • Neath
  • £49 to £69 per night
  • Distance 4.8 miles
Swansea and Gower
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The BlueBell Hotel

  • Hotel
  • Neath
  • £60 to £70 per night
  • Distance 4.8 miles
Swansea and Gower
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Blancos Hotel

  • Hotel
  • Port Talbot
  • £55 to £90 per night
  • Distance 0.4 mile
Swansea and Gower
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Cwmbach Guest House

  • Bed and Breakfast
  • Neath
  • £46 to £72 per night
  • Distance 5.6 miles
Swansea and Gower
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Twelve Knights

  • Bed and Breakfast
  • Port Talbot
  • Distance 1.9 miles
Swansea and Gower
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BEST WESTERN Aberavon Beach Hotel

  • Hotel
  • Swansea
  • Distance 1.5 miles
Swansea and Gower

About Port Talbot

It is worth visiting the large industrial town of Port Talbot if only to see the many statues dotted about the town which are proud reminders of its industrial past and present. One of the statues, called, This Mortal Coil and crafted by sculptor, Sebastian Boyes, depicts a steel worker inside a mill wheel, another, Man of Steel, shows a larger than life steelworker carrying huge bars of metal. It stands at an entry to the town centre. There is also an unusual Remembrance statue, that seems to plead for peace rather than celebrate victory, to the fallen of both World Wars situated in the park next to St Theodore's Church.

Port Talbot is built on a narrow strip of coastal plain on the eastern edge of Swansea Bay, on the estuary of the river Afon. It grew out of the small port and market town of Aberafon, which belonged to the medieval Lords of Afon.

A copper works opened in 1770 and the dock opened in 1939. It is named for the Talbot family of local landowners, who were proactive in planning Port Talbot in order to tempt business away from the nearby centre of Cardiff and Swansea. The Talbot family were related to the pioneer photographer, William Henry Fox Talbot. The family were patrons of Margam Abbey, an ancient Cistercian foundation, and they built the new Gothic Margam Castle.

By 1900 Port Talbot dock were exporting 500,000 tons of coal but by the peak in 1923 three million tons of coal was moving through the dock every year. In 1923 the borough of Port Talbot was created, incorporating Margam, Cwmavon and the old town of Aberafon.

Abbey steel works came to the town in 1952 and at that time they employed 18,000 and were the biggest employer in Wales. In 1970 a new deep harbour was opened by the Queen and Prince Philip, which could take vessels containing iron ore for the steelworks of 100,000 tons. Now judicious dredging and improvement mean that vessels with a dead weight of 170,000 tons can enter the dock.

One the edge of town is Pontrhydfen where actor, Richard Burton was born and grew up in a grey pebble dashed house. Pontrhydfen's other claim to fame is the aqueduct which was build in 1825 to supply the water to the water wheel that generated the blast for Ponrhydfen Ironworks. The canal is now filled in and the former aqueduct is now used by cyclists and walkers.

The M4 cuts through the town on a concrete viaduct. Nearby attractions are Oxwich Castle, Margam's Blue Flag beach, Margam Country Park, Afon Forest with its dedicated cycle tracks and Aberafon Sands and the South Wales Miners' Museum. Port Talbot is just 15 minutes from the beautiful countryside and golden beaches of the Gower and ten minutes from Swansea's award winning waterfront.