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Pembroke Dock accommodation

Sisters House

Large self catering house at Hundleton nr Pembroke
  • Holiday Home
  • Pembroke
  • Sleeps 1 to 12, 5 bedrooms
  • £790 to £1750 per week
  • accessible for disabled
  • internet access
  • pets welcome
Pembrokeshire

We've just finished designing and building Sisters House in the picturesque quiet village of Hundleton. It is designed to be comfortable, spacious and light with double height ceilings and patio doors in the living areas. A great space for large groups. Distance 1.9 miles.

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Llwy Garu

Modern holiday home in south Pembrokeshire
  • Holiday House
  • Hundleton
  • Sleeps 1 to 10, 5 bedrooms
  • £720 to £1720 per week
  • internet access
  • pets welcome
Pembrokeshire

Newly built holiday home with double height living areas, skylights and patio doors make it a spacious, light and comfortable. It is perfect for large groups and social get-togethers. The secluded garden and patio are perfect for barbecues. Distance 1.9 miles.

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Beekeeper's Cottage

  • Self Catering
  • Pembroke
  • Sleeps up to 4, 2 bedrooms
  • £257 to £715 per week
  • Distance 2.6 miles
  • internet access
  • pets welcome
Swansea and Gower
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Beggars Reach Hotel

  • Hotel
  • Pembrokeshire
  • £75 to £130 per night
  • Distance 2.0 miles
Pembrokeshire
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Lydstep

  • Self Catering
  • Neyland
  • Sleeps up to 5, 3 bedrooms
  • £275 to £770 per week
  • Distance 1.0 miles
  • wood burner
Swansea and Gower
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Waters' Edge

  • Self Catering
  • Pembroke Dock
  • Sleeps up to 2, 1 bedroom
  • £220 to £489 per week
  • Distance 0.6 mile
  • internet access
Swansea and Gower
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Tideways

  • Bed and Breakfast
  • Milford Haven
  • £55 to £75 per night
  • Distance 1.3 miles
Pembrokeshire
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Wagtail Cottage

  • Self Catering
  • Pembroke
  • Sleeps up to 4, 2 bedrooms
  • £285 to £753 per week
  • Distance 2.8 miles
  • internet access
  • wood burner
Pembrokeshire
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Old Kings Arms Hotel

  • Hotel
  • Pembroke
  • Distance 1.5 miles
Pembrokeshire
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Domecilia

  • Self Catering
  • Cosheston
  • Sleeps up to 21, 7 bedrooms
  • £946 to £2721 per week
  • Distance 2.3 miles
  • internet access
  • wood burner
  • hot tub
  • swimming pool
Pembrokeshire
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Herons Reach

  • Self Catering
  • Paterchurch
  • Sleeps up to 8, 4 bedrooms
  • £285 to £875 per week
  • Distance 0.7 mile
  • internet access
  • pets welcome
Pembrokeshire
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Newton Cottage

  • Self Catering
  • Pembroke Dock
  • Sleeps up to 6, 3 bedrooms
  • £296 to £1055 per week
  • Distance 1.6 miles
  • internet access
Pembrokeshire

About Pembroke Dock

The town of Pembroke Dock, which is home to a population of 9,100 and lies on the south bank of the estuary of the river, Cleddau, is a must visit place for any amateur military historian. Although the town has seen more prosperous days it puts on a bright coat of paint, particularly its jaunty red clock tower on the town hall, and looks to major schemes in the near future to restore its fortunes.

Before 1800 the area was open farmland with farm buildings dotted here and there and a medieval tower, which can still be seen in the former dockyard. The barracks with its Martello towers built of dressed Portland stone, which today is every small boy's idea of a castle, was built to house a garrison of Royal Marines. Pembroke Dock soon became a major shipbuilding centre. The first workers lived in primitive conditions but by 1914 the borough council had installed gas street lighting, running water and sewerage.

The first ships to be launched 10th February 1816, were the HMS Valorous and HMS Ariadne, both 20 gun post ships. Five Royal yachts were built at Pembroke Dock including Victoria and Albert the first, second and third. In all 263 vessels were built for the Royal Navy with the last ship, The Oleander, being launched on 26th April 1922.

In the prosperous heyday of the town benefactors built many chapels, the Temperance Hall and the Mechanics Institute. Public houses, music halls and hotels flourished.

The closure of the dockyard plus the general strike dealt Pembroke Dock a cruel blow. There were many bankruptcies and a great deal of miserable poverty. Small marine industries set up shop there but a modicum of prosperity returned after 1930 when Portland Dock became a major RAF station. Huge hangars were built to house the new Sunderland flying boats to guard the western approaches in case of a war.

Pembroke Dock was a prime target for World War two air raids and on the night of 19th August 1940 a Luftwaffe Junker ju 88 bomber flew up the Haven Waterway and dropped a string of bombs on 11 oil tankers which exploded like huge fire bombs in a conflagration which lasted for 18 days. Some two years later the town suffered heavy bombing raids, many lost their lives and the town was in ruins.

By 1945 some prosperity returned with both light and heavy industry and the nearby oil refineries and an oil fired power station. The dockyard became a base for marine services in the 1950 and in 1979 Irish Ferries commenced a twice daily service from Pembroke Dock to Rosslare.

Pembroke Dock has a link with Hollywood. The full scale Millennium Falcom built for the film, "The Empire Strikes Back", was created in one of the former flying boat hangars in 1979.

Pembroke Dock gained the maximum grant possible from the Heritage Lottery Fund to restore many of the significant buildings. Irish Ferry passengers pass by the elegantly restored Georgian architecture in the Royal Dockyard. The dockyard chapel built in 1831, the flying boat hangars and the 1851 gun tower on Front street, have all been restored. One of the Martello towers now houses a military museum.

Plans for a £100 million Marina with homes, cinema and hotels have been passed but as I write in 2009, no work has started. However, Pembroke Dock is now very dependant on visitors and situated as it is near some glorious golden beaches, magnificent cliffs and on the edge of the biggest coastal national park in the UK, it should attract many holidaymakers.