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Hay on Wye accommodation

28 Book

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Haybreaks

Luxury apartment with private parking in Hay-on-Wye
  • Self Catering Apartment
  • Hay-on-Wye
  • Sleeps up to 4, 2 bedrooms
  • £350 to £650 per week
  • availability
  • internet access
  • non smoking
Mid Wales and Brecon Beacons

Browse the bookshops, sample the many excellent eateries and bag a bargain at the market in Hay-on-Wye. This chic, spacious and well equipped apartment is just two minutes from the town centre and has private parking, a balcony, wifi and lift access. Distance 0.2 mile.

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Bullens Bank

Country cottage with fabulous views near Hay-on-Wye
  • Self Catering
  • Hay-on-Wye
  • Sleeps up to 8, 3 bedrooms
  • From £390 per week
  • availability
  • pets welcome
  • non smoking
  • wood burner
Mid Wales and Brecon Beacons

If you like to be on top of the World, this is your ideal escape. This characterful old farmhouse is at the end of a private track at an altitude of 1000ft. The views across the Welsh borderlands, into Herefordshire and beyond are unbeatable. Distance 2.7 miles.

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Llangain Farmhouse and Barn

Wye Valley self catering cottage near Hay-on-Wye
  • Self Catering Accommodation
  • Hay-on-Wye
  • Sleeps 2 to 12, 5 bedrooms
  • £390 to £810 per week
  • availability
  • pets welcome
  • non smoking
  • wood burner
Mid Wales and Brecon Beacons

Perched 1000ft above the Wye Valley, 3 miles from Hay-on-Wye, Bullens Bank Cottage and Llangain Farmhouse and Barn offer superb self catering accommodation in a spectacular location with magical views. Distance 2.7 miles.

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Tara

Farm bed and breakfast near Talgarth and Hay-on-Wye
  • Bed & Breakfast
  • Hay-on-Wye
  • Sleeps up to 6, 3 bedrooms
  • From £32 per night
  • internet access
  • non smoking
  • swimming pool
Mid Wales and Brecon Beacons

Food is our speciality, and we offer Cordon Bleu evening meals. New en-suite rooms. Quiet location with stunning views. Black Mountains walking from the house. On the National Cycle Route. Distance 4.6 miles.

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The Agent's House

  • B&B or Self Catering
  • Hay-on-Wye
  • Sleeps 1 to 5, 2 bedrooms
  • £35 to £50
  • internet access
  • non smoking
Mid Wales and Brecon Beacons

Stylish and recently renovated, our high quality, self-contained suites are just 5 miles from Hay-on-Wye with their own entrances, kitchenette, en-suite shower rooms and fire for those cosy evenings in. The house is 2 minutes' walk from the village pub. Distance 3.9 miles.

2

Tregoyd Mountain Riding Holidays

Bunkhouse and riding holidays near Hay-on-Wye
  • Riding Centre and Bunkhouse
  • Brecon
  • Sleeps up to 55
Mid Wales and Brecon Beacons

With a reputation for providing safe, enjoyable riding holidays for over 30 years, we have a range of mounts to suit the smallest jockey to experienced adult riders, the only centre in the area with direct access to the mountains. straight from the yard. Distance 3.5 miles.

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The Swan at Hay

Hay-on-Wye hotel
  • Hotel
  • Hay-on-Wye
  • Sleeps 1 to 34, 17 bedrooms
  • £75 to £145 per night
  • internet access
  • pets welcome
  • non smoking
Mid Wales and Brecon Beacons

The Swan at Hay Hotel is a delightful family-run hotel in the centre of Hay-on-Wye, the world-famous booktown. The hotel specialises in offering guests a warm welcome with its comfortable bedrooms, delicious food and excellent location. Distance 0.1 mile.

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Glanhenwye

Self catering cottages at Glasbury-on-Wye
  • Self Catering Accommodation
  • Glasbury-on-Wye
  • Sleeps up to 20
  • £530 to £1020
  • non smoking
Mid Wales and Brecon Beacons

Our three 5 star cottages offer stylish, spacious accommodation in a rural setting in the tranquil Wye Valley, near Hay-on-Wye, the Black Mountains and the Brecon Beacons. Distance 3.3 miles.

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Newcourt Campsite

Campsite at Velindre in the Black Mountains
  • Campsite
  • Velindre
  • From £5 per night
  • pets welcome
Mid Wales and Brecon Beacons

Country camping and caravan site with easy mountain access, popular with Duke of Edinburgh groups. A relaxed and simple holiday for those who want to escape from it all. Toilet and shower block, chemical waste point, electric hook ups. Dogs welcome. Distance 4.4 miles.

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Trowley Farmhouse

Farmhouse holiday let near Hay-on-Wye
  • Self Catering Accommodation
  • Hay-on-Wye
  • Sleeps up to 16, 5 bedrooms
  • £650 to £1200 per week
  • internet access
  • pets welcome
Mid Wales and Brecon Beacons

Ten minutes from Hay-on-Wye, a detached farmhouse dating from the 16th Century surrounded by open countryside and with beautiful views. Absolute peace and quiet in an unspoilt location at the end of a private lane. Secluded but not isolated. Distance 6.0 miles.

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Castle Farm

Cottages in the Black Mountains near Hay-on-Wye
  • Self Catering Cottages
  • Hay-on-Wye
  • Sleeps 2 to 30, 10 bedrooms
  • pets welcome
  • non smoking
  • wood burner
Mid Wales and Brecon Beacons

The ultimate holiday cottage destination. Situated in the wilderness, totally secluded, spectacular views and perfect for any occasion. Style and comfort tucked in the Black Mountains with a proper old cosy wood burning fire. Distance 6.1 miles.

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Baskerville Arms Hotel

  • Hotel
  • Hereford
  • £59 per night
  • Distance 1.3 miles
Mid Wales and Brecon Beacons

About Hay-on-Wye

When Bill Clinton was the main speaker at Hay's annual literary festival he declared that Hay on Wye was, “My kind of town.” I think every book lover who has ever had the good fortune to visit this small town of 1,500 souls,on the Herefordshire/Welsh border and just inside the county of Powys, would echo the president's words.

Like many of the towns on the Welsh marches, Hay is set in beautiful countryside with the clear waters of the river Wye running close by. The man who transformed the economy of this small market town and turned it into the town of books, as it is known today, is bibliophile, Richard George William Pitt Booth, who lived in Hay Castle and was himself a seller of second hand books. On all fools' day, April 1st 1977 Mr Booth staged a publicity stunt which resounded around the world. He declared Hay to be an independent kingdom, himself the monarch, and his horse the prime minister.

After this many book sellers beat a pathway to Hay and Richard Booth helped them to set up shop in the most unlikely buildings, such as the former fire station. Now Hay has about 40 second hand book shops with a good mixture of specialist and general book shops.

Now the Hay Festival of Literature, held annually in May over seven days, and currently organised by The Guardian newspaper, attracts more than 85,000 visitors from all over the world to its 500 events. It is estimated that the festival pumps about £3 million annually into the local economy. And indeed, Hay on Wye does look an extremely well cared for and prosperous town. Although the town seems permeated with the wonderful smell of paper and print, beloved by all bibliophiles, Hay is not just about books.

There's lots more here. The Red Kite Youth Theatre, created for a one off festival production ten years back, is still alive and kicking with workshop and productions throughout the year. On All Hallows Eve, Hay on Fire is held, which includes a carnival procession of bands, drummers and dancers culminating in a spectacular fire performance set against the midnight sky.

In November there is a festival of the arts called Crunch, which always has a theme. The tourist information office, in the Craft Centre at Hay, is open seven days a week with just one day off for Christmas. Programmes for the Literature Festival in May are available from the start of April each year. Former famous speakers include, Paul McCartney, Van Morrison, Ian McEwan and Germaine Greer, to name but a few.

Hay's oldest pub is the Three Tuns. Famous people to have enjoyed a snifter in the bar there include Marianne Faithful and Jools Holland and five of the great train robbers on the run.

Nearby is the peaceful village of Clyro which is where, it is thought, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, gathered material, and also used the name of the local landed family, for his story, The Hound of the Baskervilles. It was here that the curate, Reverend Francis Kilvert minutely observed daily life and the flora and fauna, in his diaries.